Temporary skilled international migration of young professional cricketers: ‘going Down-Under’ to move-up the career path

Catherine Waite, Darren P Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent theories of temporary skilled international migration tend to be predicated on intra-company overseas transfers and secondments. In this paper we present original findings from a study of cricket migrants to highlight another important form of temporary international movements that enable upskilling from strategic, channelled placements into a foreign club, to propel the careers of young professionals on return migration to their respective home club. Drawing upon interviews with 35 early-career English cricketers, we reveal that moving to Australia for 3-6 months during the English domestic off-season is an increasingly common practice to extend the number of months playing the sport in both distinctive work and climatic conditions. Encountering different overseas sporting cultures and environments is becoming a normative part of formative training and development of young professional cricketers to make the ‘‘unfamiliar’ more ‘familiar’’ and enhance skills and competencies. We argue that these flows of international migrants have been facilitated by the post-2001 professionalization of cricket, and the institutionalisation of global networks between cricket organisations and key actors in the sport. We suggest that there are parallels between cricket placements and other sports and occupational sectors, such as temporary overseas moves linked to loans (e.g. football), visiting fellowships, internships and secondments, in ever-competitive global professional labour markets.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)70-76
Number of pages7
JournalGeoforum
Volume84
Early online date12 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 12 Jun 2017

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international migration
overseas
Sports
career
club
migrant
internship
professionalization
institutionalization
loan
labor market
migration
interview

Keywords

  • International migration
  • temporary
  • cricket
  • England to Australia
  • career
  • professionalization
  • globalization

Cite this

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Temporary skilled international migration of young professional cricketers: ‘going Down-Under’ to move-up the career path. / Waite, Catherine; Smith, Darren P.

In: Geoforum, Vol. 84, 12.06.2017, p. 70-76.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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