The 'New Chum': writings of the English Diaspora in New Zealand 1860-1914

Janet M Wilson, Lyndon Fraser (Editor), Angela McCarthy (Editor)

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article studies the writing of first generation English settlers in New Zealand, identifying a strong sense of alienation as key to its orientation. This both 'underlies and subverts the myth of settlement'. The article argues that the writing of early English Diaspora writers like Alfred Domett, Lady Mary Anne Barker, Samuel Butler, Blanche Baughan and Margaret Escott anticipates and overlaps with the cultural nationalism of the 1930s in its concern with the social outsider, at first appearing in the figure of the 'new chum' and by the 1930s represented by that of the 'man alone'
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFar From 'Home': The English in New Zealand
Place of PublicationDunedin, New Zealand
PublisherOtago University Press
Pages165-185
Number of pages232
ISBN (Print)9781877578328
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012

Fingerprint

Diaspora
New Zealand
1930s
Writer
Alienation
Early English
Appearings
Overlap
Cultural Nationalism
Settler
Outsider

Keywords

  • diaspora
  • New Zealand
  • 'New chum'
  • English
  • migration

Cite this

Wilson, J. M., Fraser, L. (Ed.), & McCarthy, A. (Ed.) (2012). The 'New Chum': writings of the English Diaspora in New Zealand 1860-1914. In Far From 'Home': The English in New Zealand (pp. 165-185). Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press.
Wilson, Janet M ; Fraser, Lyndon (Editor) ; McCarthy, Angela (Editor). / The 'New Chum': writings of the English Diaspora in New Zealand 1860-1914. Far From 'Home': The English in New Zealand. Dunedin, New Zealand : Otago University Press, 2012. pp. 165-185
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Wilson, JM, Fraser, L (ed.) & McCarthy, A (ed.) 2012, The 'New Chum': writings of the English Diaspora in New Zealand 1860-1914. in Far From 'Home': The English in New Zealand. Otago University Press, Dunedin, New Zealand, pp. 165-185.

The 'New Chum': writings of the English Diaspora in New Zealand 1860-1914. / Wilson, Janet M; Fraser, Lyndon (Editor); McCarthy, Angela (Editor).

Far From 'Home': The English in New Zealand. Dunedin, New Zealand : Otago University Press, 2012. p. 165-185.

Research output: Contribution to Book/Report typesChapterResearchpeer-review

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AB - This article studies the writing of first generation English settlers in New Zealand, identifying a strong sense of alienation as key to its orientation. This both 'underlies and subverts the myth of settlement'. The article argues that the writing of early English Diaspora writers like Alfred Domett, Lady Mary Anne Barker, Samuel Butler, Blanche Baughan and Margaret Escott anticipates and overlaps with the cultural nationalism of the 1930s in its concern with the social outsider, at first appearing in the figure of the 'new chum' and by the 1930s represented by that of the 'man alone'

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Wilson JM, Fraser L, (ed.), McCarthy A, (ed.). The 'New Chum': writings of the English Diaspora in New Zealand 1860-1914. In Far From 'Home': The English in New Zealand. Dunedin, New Zealand: Otago University Press. 2012. p. 165-185