Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists

Elizabeth C Roxburgh, Rachel Evenden

Research output: Contribution to conference typesPoster

Abstract

Objectives: To investigate 1) the experiences of clients who have reported anomalous experiences (AEs) in secular counselling services, 2) the experiences of therapists who work with such clients, and 3) the training needs of students. Method: Interviews were conducted with clients and therapists, and focus groups explored the training needs of students on counselling programmes. Results: When clients sought counselling the majority of participants we interviewed said that they felt dismissed when they tried to discuss AEs or reported that their counsellor did not take into account their worldview. Therapists reflected on how clients are often reluctant to disclose AEs to them for fear of being seen as ‘mad’. They emphasised the importance of exploring the meaning with clients rather than imposing an explanation or making a judgement as to the authenticity of AEs. Most of the students that took part in the focus groups felt that they were unequipped to work with clients who reported AEs and stated that they had not received any training on these issues. Conclusions: Findings have implications for clients in terms of accessibility of services, engagement with therapy, and psychological adjustment following AEs. It would be useful for therapists to have reliable and accurate information about AEs and/or for students to be introduced to the topic whilst undertaking training.

Conference

ConferenceBial Foundation 11th Symposium: Behind and Beyond the Brain: Placebo Effects, Healing and Meditation
Period31/03/16 → …
Internet address

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parapsychology
therapist
counseling
experience
student
worldview
counselor
authenticity
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Cite this

Roxburgh, E. C., & Evenden, R. (2016). Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists. Poster session presented at Bial Foundation 11th Symposium: Behind and Beyond the Brain: Placebo Effects, Healing and Meditation, .
Roxburgh, Elizabeth C ; Evenden, Rachel. / Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists. Poster session presented at Bial Foundation 11th Symposium: Behind and Beyond the Brain: Placebo Effects, Healing and Meditation, .
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abstract = "Objectives: To investigate 1) the experiences of clients who have reported anomalous experiences (AEs) in secular counselling services, 2) the experiences of therapists who work with such clients, and 3) the training needs of students. Method: Interviews were conducted with clients and therapists, and focus groups explored the training needs of students on counselling programmes. Results: When clients sought counselling the majority of participants we interviewed said that they felt dismissed when they tried to discuss AEs or reported that their counsellor did not take into account their worldview. Therapists reflected on how clients are often reluctant to disclose AEs to them for fear of being seen as ‘mad’. They emphasised the importance of exploring the meaning with clients rather than imposing an explanation or making a judgement as to the authenticity of AEs. Most of the students that took part in the focus groups felt that they were unequipped to work with clients who reported AEs and stated that they had not received any training on these issues. Conclusions: Findings have implications for clients in terms of accessibility of services, engagement with therapy, and psychological adjustment following AEs. It would be useful for therapists to have reliable and accurate information about AEs and/or for students to be introduced to the topic whilst undertaking training.",
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Roxburgh, EC & Evenden, R 2016, 'Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists' Bial Foundation 11th Symposium: Behind and Beyond the Brain: Placebo Effects, Healing and Meditation, 31/03/16, .

Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists. / Roxburgh, Elizabeth C; Evenden, Rachel.

2016. Poster session presented at Bial Foundation 11th Symposium: Behind and Beyond the Brain: Placebo Effects, Healing and Meditation, .

Research output: Contribution to conference typesPoster

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T1 - Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists

AU - Roxburgh, Elizabeth C

AU - Evenden, Rachel

PY - 2016/3/31

Y1 - 2016/3/31

N2 - Objectives: To investigate 1) the experiences of clients who have reported anomalous experiences (AEs) in secular counselling services, 2) the experiences of therapists who work with such clients, and 3) the training needs of students. Method: Interviews were conducted with clients and therapists, and focus groups explored the training needs of students on counselling programmes. Results: When clients sought counselling the majority of participants we interviewed said that they felt dismissed when they tried to discuss AEs or reported that their counsellor did not take into account their worldview. Therapists reflected on how clients are often reluctant to disclose AEs to them for fear of being seen as ‘mad’. They emphasised the importance of exploring the meaning with clients rather than imposing an explanation or making a judgement as to the authenticity of AEs. Most of the students that took part in the focus groups felt that they were unequipped to work with clients who reported AEs and stated that they had not received any training on these issues. Conclusions: Findings have implications for clients in terms of accessibility of services, engagement with therapy, and psychological adjustment following AEs. It would be useful for therapists to have reliable and accurate information about AEs and/or for students to be introduced to the topic whilst undertaking training.

AB - Objectives: To investigate 1) the experiences of clients who have reported anomalous experiences (AEs) in secular counselling services, 2) the experiences of therapists who work with such clients, and 3) the training needs of students. Method: Interviews were conducted with clients and therapists, and focus groups explored the training needs of students on counselling programmes. Results: When clients sought counselling the majority of participants we interviewed said that they felt dismissed when they tried to discuss AEs or reported that their counsellor did not take into account their worldview. Therapists reflected on how clients are often reluctant to disclose AEs to them for fear of being seen as ‘mad’. They emphasised the importance of exploring the meaning with clients rather than imposing an explanation or making a judgement as to the authenticity of AEs. Most of the students that took part in the focus groups felt that they were unequipped to work with clients who reported AEs and stated that they had not received any training on these issues. Conclusions: Findings have implications for clients in terms of accessibility of services, engagement with therapy, and psychological adjustment following AEs. It would be useful for therapists to have reliable and accurate information about AEs and/or for students to be introduced to the topic whilst undertaking training.

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M3 - Poster

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Roxburgh EC, Evenden R. Clinical parapsychology: counselling experiences of clients who report anomalous experiences and the training needs of therapists. 2016. Poster session presented at Bial Foundation 11th Symposium: Behind and Beyond the Brain: Placebo Effects, Healing and Meditation, .