“It’s about having exposure to this”: investigating the training needs of therapists in relation to the issue of anomalous experiences

Elizabeth C Roxburgh, Rachel Evenden

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two focus groups, consisting of six participants each, were conducted to explore the training needs of therapists when working with clients reporting anomalous experiences (AEs). AEs are those that “depart from our own familiar personal experiences or from the more usual, ordinary, and expected experiences of a given culture and time” (Braud, 2012, p.107). A thematic analysis revealed four themes: ‘Quite often we get taken by surprise because it’s a subject we don’t talk about’, ‘It’s just having this in our vocabulary’, ‘Demystifying and valuing AEs as normal human experiences’, and ‘To ask or not to ask?’. Most of the participants felt that they were unequipped to work with clients reporting AEs and suggestions were made for overcoming this.
Original languageEnglish
JournalBritish Journal of Guidance and Counselling
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Anomalous experiences
  • counselling training
  • focus groups
  • qualitative methods
  • students

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