Would podiatrists benefit from an expert system for clinical reasoning and diagnosis? A study using laddering

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

Abstract

Background: Computer expert systems may be of benefit to podiatrists in assisting in diagnosis. However little is known about how podiatrists use certain forms of clinical reasoning in making a diagnosis. Objectives: To investigate the mechanisms used by podiatrists in the process of clinical reasoning and whether a computer expert system may aid the process of diagnosis. Method: Laddering was used on a random sample of 12 podiatrists to find why podiatrists use certain mechanisms of clinical reasoning to make a diagnosis. Each podiatrist was interviewed by telephone and the information recorded to audio tape. A content analysis of the laddering data produced a hierarchical value map for clinical reasoning. Results: The hierarchical value map suggested that the podiatrists rely on tacit knowledge and highly schematized knowledge for their clinical decision making. It was concluded that a computer expert system is not the best technology for clinical decision making in this context
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71-75
Number of pages5
JournalThe Foot
Volume16
Issue number2
Early online date3 Mar 2006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2006

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Expert Systems
Computer Systems
Telephone
Technology
Clinical Decision-Making

Keywords

  • Laddering
  • Computer expert system
  • Tacit knowledge
  • Schemata
  • Clinical reasoning
  • Podiatry
  • Diagnosis

Cite this

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abstract = "Background: Computer expert systems may be of benefit to podiatrists in assisting in diagnosis. However little is known about how podiatrists use certain forms of clinical reasoning in making a diagnosis. Objectives: To investigate the mechanisms used by podiatrists in the process of clinical reasoning and whether a computer expert system may aid the process of diagnosis. Method: Laddering was used on a random sample of 12 podiatrists to find why podiatrists use certain mechanisms of clinical reasoning to make a diagnosis. Each podiatrist was interviewed by telephone and the information recorded to audio tape. A content analysis of the laddering data produced a hierarchical value map for clinical reasoning. Results: The hierarchical value map suggested that the podiatrists rely on tacit knowledge and highly schematized knowledge for their clinical decision making. It was concluded that a computer expert system is not the best technology for clinical decision making in this context",
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Would podiatrists benefit from an expert system for clinical reasoning and diagnosis? A study using laddering. / Curran, Mike; Rugg, Gordon; Campbell, Jackie.

In: The Foot, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.06.2006, p. 71-75.

Research output: Contribution to JournalArticle

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