Providing training in positive behavioural support and physical interventions for parents of children with autism and related behavioural difficulties

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Though professionals working with children on the autism spectrum who display challenging behaviour routinely receive training in the use of both positive behavioural support techniques and physical interventions, such training is rarely provided for the parents of these children. This article reports on the impact of training provided for family members associated with eight children aged 7–11 years who were associated with the same special school. Participants were surveyed before and after training, and at a 12-week follow-up session. Data were triangulated by interviewing staff providing and supporting the training. The results suggest that attending the training increased parents’ confidence in understanding and managing the child’s behaviour, and reduced the use of physical interventions. Positive factors associated with parent training are discussed, as well as challenges to its provision, and the cost and potential impact of providing training is compared with other models of support. Limitations of the study and areas for further research are identified.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2
Pages (from-to)136-153
Number of pages18
JournalSupport for Learning
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2014

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Autistic Disorder
Parents
Child Behavior
Costs and Cost Analysis
Research

Keywords

  • Autism
  • challenging behaviour
  • parent education
  • physical interventions

Cite this

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abstract = "Though professionals working with children on the autism spectrum who display challenging behaviour routinely receive training in the use of both positive behavioural support techniques and physical interventions, such training is rarely provided for the parents of these children. This article reports on the impact of training provided for family members associated with eight children aged 7–11 years who were associated with the same special school. Participants were surveyed before and after training, and at a 12-week follow-up session. Data were triangulated by interviewing staff providing and supporting the training. The results suggest that attending the training increased parents’ confidence in understanding and managing the child’s behaviour, and reduced the use of physical interventions. Positive factors associated with parent training are discussed, as well as challenges to its provision, and the cost and potential impact of providing training is compared with other models of support. Limitations of the study and areas for further research are identified.",
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